Spreading the Love

When David V. Stewart put out a call to donate works to a free anthology of stories to distract people from the current Big Hoopty, I jumped at the chance.  It’s not often you get the opportunity to offer some escape from the horrors of modern germ-warfare to a billion people.

Within two days he threw together this incredible collection of works from some of the heaviest of the heavy hitters of the pulse-pounding, pulp-astounding subculture retaking genre fiction from the ossified and sissified writers who publish from Snoozeville on the Hudson.

My own offering of Adventure Constant represents just a fraction of the 200,000 words you can grab for free, and has been re-written, just a touch, to include a don’t-blink-or-you’ll-miss-it cameo by the eponymous s CoronaChan her own infectious self.

Click the image and grab a copy while you can.  This represents a short-term deal to give those facing a looming economic crash a chance at some entertainment.  It has also been priced right where readers can take a risk-free chance on some new names in genre writing, just on the off chance that they find a new source of great reads.  A lot of others have already taken the plunge, with the title reaching number one on Amazon’s free reads.

Hope you enjoy it – stay safe out there everyone!  I’m praying for you.

 

About Jon Mollison

Jon Mollison was weaned at the literary knee of Tolkein, Howard, Moore, and Burroughs. He spent decades wandering in the wilderness of modern genre fiction, wondering when the magic and wonder went out of the world of dragons and space ships. In his darkest hour, he encountered a wise man who handed him the open secrets to crafting works that emulate the stories of the great authors who built the genre. They are easily summarized in but two words: Regress Harder. Now one of the twelve champions of the Pulp Revolution, his self-published works represent a more direct lineage to the tales of action, mystery, romance, virtue, and pure unalloyed adventure than the bland imitations churned out by New York City publishing houses in recent decades.
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